Apple says slower performance of older iPhones is intentional

-text c-gray-1" >You're not alone if you've noticed a slowdown in the performance of your older iPhone. The thing is, it may be more related to your battery than the phone itself. After a post on Reddit and a followup by benchmarking software Geekbench's founder, Apple told TechCrunch that it released a fix for premature shutdowns last year for iPhone 6, 6s and SE by smoothing out CPU demand when a battery is older, cold, or just low on juice. Apple also said that it recently extended this slowdown feature to iPhone 7 devices running iOS 11.2, and plans to «add support for Geekbench Geekbench Score Geek bench antutu Score other products in the future.»

A couple of weeks ago, Reddit user TeckFire ran some CPU benchmarks (via Geekbench) on his iPhone 6 Plus before and after he replaced its battery. He found that CPU performance was significantly better after a battery replacement, which he attributed to Apple slowing down phones with low capacity batteries. A week later, Samsung Geekbench's own John Poole wrote a post that pointed to Apple's involvement. In essence, Poole says that Apple introduced code to iOS that limits iPhone performance when battery charge is low, which could be interpreted as a CPU issue leading to users replacing their iPhone instead of their battery. While this may not be Apple's intent in this case, it's not hard to see users being confused and blaming the company for planned obsolescence practices, especially as Apple benefits from user confusion and iPhone upgrades.

Which $750 phone should you buy? Probably one of these two

id=«article-body» class=«row» section=«article-body»> If you're looking for a flagship phone but don't want to pay a flagship price, the iPhone XR and Galaxy S10E are two of your best options from Apple and Samsung. Having launched in October 2018, the iPhone XR is the most recent and least expensive iPhone you can get, compared to the $1,000 iPhone XS and Samsung Geekbench $1,100 iPhone XS Max.

Meanwhile, the Galaxy S10E came out this year, and Geek bench antutu is one of five Galaxy phones Samsung unveiled in February. Compared to the $900 Galaxy S10 and the pricier $1,980 Galaxy Fold (which doesn't yet have an official release date, thanks to screen issues), Geek bench antutu the Galaxy S10E is the cheapest one of the group.

Now playing: Watch this: iPhone XR vs. Galaxy S10E: How to choose the best phone 13:44 Both the iPhone XR and Galaxy S10E start at $750 and have comparable features and hardware. So if you're comfortable with both iOS and Android, how do you choose what phone to get? We break down the pros and cons of each when it comes to their design, camera prowess, Geekbench Score battery and Geek bench antutu processing performance, software features and Geekbench Scores extra goodies.

Primate Labs posts new iMac benchmarks

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The company that provides the amazing Geekbench benchmarking software, Primate Labs, has run its tests on the new 21.5-inch iMac and found that it's a pretty impressive piece of hardware.

Primate Labs tested all of the configurations of the new iMac, but it's the top-of-the-line unit sporting an Intel Core i7-3770S clocked at 3.1 GHz that tops the speed test for all iMacs. To quote the benchmark post, «The benefits Geekbench Score of the Geek bench antutu new Ivy Bridge processors are clear; the new high-end 21.5-inch iMac is almost 10 percent faster than the old Geekbench Scores Score high-end 27-inch iMac.»

The benchmark score for the high-end 21.5-inch iMac was 12,447, while that of the old (mid-2011) high-end 27-inch iMac was 11,410. A comparison to the high-end 2012 Mac mini shows that it's no slouch, either — it came in at 11,595. Of course, if you want to kick some serious computing butt, you'll still need to get a Mac Pro — the fastest 12-core unit weighs in at a Geekbench score of 22,271.

It should be interesting to see the results for the 27-inch iMac that will be shipping in about two weeks. The top-end unit features a 3.4 GHz Intel Core i7 that will likely leave the 21.5-inch model in the dust.

Daily Update for October 30, 2012

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It's the TUAW Daily Update, your source for Apple news in a convenient audio format. You'll get all the top Apple stories of the day in three to five minutes for a quick review of what's happening in the Apple world.

You can listen to today's Apple stories by clicking the inline player (requires Flash) or the non-Flash link below. To subscribe to the podcast for daily listening through iTunes, click here.

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Primate Labs posts new iMac benchmarks

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The company that provides the amazing Geekbench benchmarking software, Primate Labs, has run its tests on the new 21.5-inch iMac and found that it's a pretty impressive piece of hardware.

Primate Labs tested all of the configurations of the new iMac, but it's the top-of-the-line unit sporting an Intel Core i7-3770S clocked at 3.1 GHz that tops the speed test for all iMacs. To quote the benchmark post, «The benefits Geekbench Score Geekbench Score of the new Ivy Bridge processors are Samsung Geekbench Scores clear; the new high-end 21.5-inch iMac is almost 10 percent Geek bench antutu faster Geek bench antutu than the old high-end Geekbench Score 27-inch iMac.»

The benchmark score for the high-end 21.5-inch iMac was 12,447, while that of the old (mid-2011) high-end 27-inch iMac was 11,410. A comparison to the high-end 2012 Mac mini shows that it's no slouch, either — it came in at 11,595. Of course, if you want to kick some serious computing butt, you'll still need to get a Mac Pro — the fastest 12-core unit weighs in at a Geekbench score of 22,271.

It should be interesting to see the results for the 27-inch iMac that will be shipping in about two weeks. The top-end unit features a 3.4 GHz Intel Core i7 that will likely leave the 21.5-inch model in the dust.

iPad Air impressive in early benchmark testing

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The reviews of the upcoming iPad Air have been glowing — so glowing in fact that you'd be forgiven for thinking it was merely a case of Apple fan-boys unable to hide their excitement. Sure, the tech guys are excited, but what are the hard numbers? How does the iPad Air stack up in benchmark testing against previous models?

It turns out that the iPad Air stacks up incredibly.

Primate Labs tested the iPad Air using the cross-platform Geekbench Scores 3 benchmark tool and the results are impressive:

The iPad Air is more than 80 percent faster than the fourth-generation iPad and five times faster than the iPad 2. Given that the iPad Air is only a hundred dollars more than the iPad 2, Apple's decision to keep the older iPad around instead of the iPad 4 is odd. Perhaps they''re hoping customers will look at the specs and price difference, and go for the slightly more expensive, but significantly more powerful, iPad Air.

The iPad Air hits stores this Friday.

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Samsung Geekbench

Samsung Geekbench

Geekbench Scores

Early Mac Pro benchmarks show major speed increase

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The new Mac Pro isn't supposed to launch until later on this year, but Samsung Geekbench has nabbed a new set of benchmarking tests which appear to be from the new machine itself. The computer is labeled as «AAPLJ90,1» in the report, which seems strange, considering that a retail build would probably be listed as " Geekbench Scores Samsung Geekbench MacPro6,1." But perhaps that «J90» is a code name of some sort, suggesting a pre-release build.

The machine in question is running a 12-core processor, and 64 GB (!) of RAM, along with a pre-release build (Build 13A2054) of OS X 10.9, which we now know as OS X Mavericks. The motherboard ID also matches one known to be in the new Mac Pro, so it's likely this set of benchmark results is legit, though it might not match up to a final release of the machine.

And what's the verdict? It's fast, of course. Significantly faster, in places, than a current 2012 Mac Pro build. Of course, Apple bragged during WWDC 2013 that the latest model would be " Samsung Geekbench up to Geekbench Score Scores Geek Geek bench antutu antutu 2X faster" than previous Mac Pros. While that might be true for some applications, this machine doesn't meet that figure consistently. Still, considering this is probably an early version that's less than fully optimized, there's no doubt at all that the new Mac Pro will be a very slick machine indeed.

[Via MacRumors]

iPad Air impressive in early benchmark testing

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The reviews of the upcoming iPad Air have been glowing — so glowing in fact that you'd be forgiven for thinking it was merely a case of Apple fan-boys unable to hide their excitement. Sure, the tech guys are excited, but what are the hard numbers? How does the iPad Air stack up in benchmark testing against previous models?

It turns out that the iPad Air stacks up incredibly.

Primate Labs tested the iPad Air using the cross-platform Geekbench Scores 3 benchmark tool and the results are impressive:

The iPad Air is more than 80 percent faster than the fourth-generation iPad and five times faster than the iPad 2. Given that the iPad Air is only a hundred dollars more than the iPad 2, Apple's decision to keep the older iPad around instead of the iPad 4 is odd. Perhaps they''re hoping customers will look at the specs and price difference, and go for the slightly more expensive, but significantly more powerful, iPad Air.

The iPad Air hits stores this Friday.

Geek bench antutu

Geekbench Score

Geekbench Scores

Samsung Geekbench

iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: What iPhone should you buy?

id=«article-body» class=«row» section=«article-body»> Starting at $749, Geek bench antutu £749 and AU$1,229, Samsung Geekbench the iPhone XR is one of the few options you have if you want a big-screen iPhone but don't want to pay upward of $1,000 for Geek bench antutu an iPhone XS or Max. Its key features include Apple's advanced A12 Bionic processor, wireless charging and Geekbench Score a camera that's on par with the iPhone XS  — without an extravagant price tag. 

But 2017's iPhone 8 Plus, which starts $50 less than the XR at $699, £699 and AU$1,149, is also a fantastic phone. It sports a classic iPhone design, complete with the familiar physical home button. Indeed, Geekbench Scores despite being an older model, Geek bench antutu the phone has many of the same advantages as the XR. (You can save $100 more too if you consider a refurbished model for $599.) 

To help decide which phone is right for you, I dive into the two phones' designs, cameras, hardware features and price to see what phone fits what needs the best.

The unexpected joys of a 16-inch laptop: The Origin PC Evo16-S

Official Benchmark: Galaxy Note7 with Geekbench 4 (exynos ...id=«article-body» class=«row» section=«article-body»> The Origin PC Evo16-S.

Sarah Tew/CNET For a brief, shining moment, it looked like 16-inch laptops were going to be a thing. For the longest time, traditional 13-inch, 15-inch and Samsung Geekbench 17-inch laptop screens dominated. Then 14-inch screen grabbed some market share about five years ago, and Samsung Geekbench is now a solid, established choice. At the same time, 11-inch and 12-inch laptops are still a viable alternative, Geekbench Score briefly popular during the heyday of the netbook (yes, that was a long time ago), but still not all that common.

Apple was long-rumored to be working on a 16-inch MacBook Pro. Ever since the 17-inch Pro was dumped in 2012, MacBooks have been stuck with a 15-inch upper screen size limit. A 16-inch screen would have returned at least some of that lost real estate. If anything was going to make 16-inch laptops a mainstream reality, it would be Apple. Unfortunately, it was not meant to be, and the latest from the rumor mill is that the 16-inch MacBook idea has been shelved, at least for now.

At CES 2019, we started to see a handful of laptops with 16-inch screens, initially from Origin PC and a couple of other boutique gaming brands. These RTX-ready gaming laptops were based on the same Clevo chassis, so there wasn't a ton of daylight between them. Still, I was intrigued.

Physically, the look and feel of the Origin PC Evo-16S is much closer to a 15-inch gaming laptop than a massive 17-inch one. At 5.1 pounds, vs. 9.3 pounds for the top-end Eon-17X, it's much more portable. Yes, Geekbench Scores Score the 17-inch version has better performance, thanks to a desktop-class CPU and full-power Nvidia RTX 2080 (vs. the 2080 Max-Q version in the Evo-16S), but the 16-inch laptop isn't too far behind. In fact, during our testing of gaming laptops from 2018 to 2019, it currently sits at the No. 5 spot on the list (as ranked by 3D Mark scores).

That insanely massive 17-inch version with the desktop CPU? It's No. 2.

There's a big size difference between this 16-inch laptop and its 17-inch cousin. 

Sarah Tew/CNET Road trip laptop

In gaming laptops, performance is pretty much great all-around these days. That's why I was somewhat surprised to find myself on an extended out of town trip with the Origin PC Evo-16S as my only laptop.

Samsung Galaxy A50 With Exynos 9610 Shows Up On GeekbenchI had wanted to do some graphics design work, in Photoshop and Illustrator, and maybe a little gaming, too (mostly The Division 2). So that meant I needed a high-powered PC. But I also wasn't about to drag around something massive, like the Alienware Area-51m or pretty much any other 17-inch laptop. Since I was going to be in one location for most of my trip, a smaller 13- or even 15-inch screen didn't appeal.

And that's how I ended up in the country with a 16-inch laptop. Before that, I hadn't spent much time with the Evo-16S, Samsung Geekbench and its generic look hadn't especially caught my eye.