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Apple says slower performance of older iPhones is intentional

-text c-gray-1" >You're not alone if you've noticed a slowdown in the performance of your older iPhone. The thing is, it may be more related to your battery than the phone itself. After a post on Reddit and a followup by benchmarking software Geekbench's founder, Apple told TechCrunch that it released a fix for premature shutdowns last year for iPhone 6, 6s and SE by smoothing out CPU demand when a battery is older, cold, or just low on juice. Apple also said that it recently extended this slowdown feature to iPhone 7 devices running iOS 11.2, and plans to «add support Geekbench Score Scores for Geek bench antutu other Samsung Geekbench Geekbench Samsung Geek bench Geek bench antutu antutu Geekbench Score products in the future.»

A couple of weeks ago, Reddit user TeckFire ran some CPU benchmarks (via Geekbench) on his iPhone 6 Plus before and after he replaced its battery. He found that CPU performance was significantly better after a battery replacement, which he attributed to Apple slowing down phones with low capacity batteries. A week later, Geekbench's own John Poole wrote a post that pointed to Apple's involvement. In essence, Poole says that Apple introduced code to iOS that limits iPhone performance when battery charge is low, which could be interpreted as a CPU issue leading to users replacing their iPhone instead of their battery. While this may not be Apple's intent in this case, it's not hard to see users being confused and blaming the company for planned obsolescence practices, especially as Apple benefits from user confusion and iPhone upgrades.

Daily Update for October 30, 2012

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iPad Air: Unboxing, first impressions and benchmarks

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Today's the first day of availability for the new iPad Air, and after totally forgetting to order it online at 1 AM MT, I got onto the online Apple Store at around 7:30 AM to order one. After confirming that the model I wanted — 32 GB, silver, AT&T — was in stock at the Aspen Grove Apple Store in Littleton, CO, I pushed the button. I picked it up at around 11:30 AM, and was in and out of the store in about five minutes.

I'm one of those sick individuals who tends to hold onto the old boxes for my Apple products, so I was able to do a quick size comparison with the 3rd-generation iPad and iPad mini. The box was the same height and thickness as that of the iPad, but not as wide. With that silliness out of the way, it was time to grab the scissors and actually open the box:

I apologize for the video quality, but I get sooo excited with a new iPad. Some people like new cars, some people get excited about new clothes, I love new tech.

It's when you first get your hands on the iPad Air that you realize just how good a job Apple did at trimming the weight. It weighs only about 6 ounces more than an iPad mini, as you'll see in the weigh-in pictures in the slideshow below.

Gallery: iPad Air | 9 Photos
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I found the display on the iPad Air to be slightly brighter than that of the 17-month-old 3rd-generation iPad at the same brightness setting, and it had a slightly warmer tint to it. There's a side-by-side image in the slideshow that demonstrates this.

In terms of speed, the Air seems to be quite snappy. «Snappy» isn't a good quantitative unit of measure, so I installed Geekbench 3 on all three iPads to get a much better picture of exactly how fast they all are:

Geekbench Score Comparison
SIngle-Core Score Multi-Core Score

iPad Air 1469 2675

iPad (3rd-Gen.) 262 494

iPad mini (1st-Gen.) 259 468
Yes, the iPad Air is FAST. All apps except Samsung Geekbench were shut down and the devices were restarted before running the benchmark. The device specs are as follows:

Device Specifications
Model iPad Air iPad (3rd-Gen.) iPad mini (1st-Gen.)

OS Version 7.0.3 7.0.3 7.0.3

Processor A7 @ 1.39 GHz A5X @ 1.00 GHz A5 @ 1.00 GHz

RAM 976 MB 988 MB 503 MB

Storage 32 GB 32 GB 16 GB
All in all, my initial impressions of the iPad Air are very favorable. I hope to do some additional tests in the near future for publication here on TUAW.

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iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: What iPhone should you buy?

id=«article-body» class=«row» section=«article-body»> Starting at $749, Geek bench antutu £749 and AU$1,229, Samsung Geekbench the iPhone XR is one of the few options you have if you want a big-screen iPhone but don't want to pay upward of $1,000 for Geek bench antutu an iPhone XS or Max. Its key features include Apple's advanced A12 Bionic processor, wireless charging and Geekbench Score a camera that's on par with the iPhone XS  — without an extravagant price tag. 

But 2017's iPhone 8 Plus, which starts $50 less than the XR at $699, £699 and AU$1,149, is also a fantastic phone. It sports a classic iPhone design, complete with the familiar physical home button. Indeed, Geekbench Scores despite being an older model, Geek bench antutu the phone has many of the same advantages as the XR. (You can save $100 more too if you consider a refurbished model for $599.) 

To help decide which phone is right for you, I dive into the two phones' designs, cameras, hardware features and price to see what phone fits what needs the best.

The unexpected joys of a 16-inch laptop: The Origin PC Evo16-S

Official Benchmark: Galaxy Note7 with Geekbench 4 (exynos ...id=«article-body» class=«row» section=«article-body»> The Origin PC Evo16-S.

Sarah Tew/CNET For a brief, shining moment, it looked like 16-inch laptops were going to be a thing. For the longest time, traditional 13-inch, 15-inch and Samsung Geekbench 17-inch laptop screens dominated. Then 14-inch screen grabbed some market share about five years ago, and Samsung Geekbench is now a solid, established choice. At the same time, 11-inch and 12-inch laptops are still a viable alternative, Geekbench Score briefly popular during the heyday of the netbook (yes, that was a long time ago), but still not all that common.

Apple was long-rumored to be working on a 16-inch MacBook Pro. Ever since the 17-inch Pro was dumped in 2012, MacBooks have been stuck with a 15-inch upper screen size limit. A 16-inch screen would have returned at least some of that lost real estate. If anything was going to make 16-inch laptops a mainstream reality, it would be Apple. Unfortunately, it was not meant to be, and the latest from the rumor mill is that the 16-inch MacBook idea has been shelved, at least for now.

At CES 2019, we started to see a handful of laptops with 16-inch screens, initially from Origin PC and a couple of other boutique gaming brands. These RTX-ready gaming laptops were based on the same Clevo chassis, so there wasn't a ton of daylight between them. Still, I was intrigued.

Physically, the look and feel of the Origin PC Evo-16S is much closer to a 15-inch gaming laptop than a massive 17-inch one. At 5.1 pounds, vs. 9.3 pounds for the top-end Eon-17X, it's much more portable. Yes, Geekbench Scores Score the 17-inch version has better performance, thanks to a desktop-class CPU and full-power Nvidia RTX 2080 (vs. the 2080 Max-Q version in the Evo-16S), but the 16-inch laptop isn't too far behind. In fact, during our testing of gaming laptops from 2018 to 2019, it currently sits at the No. 5 spot on the list (as ranked by 3D Mark scores).

That insanely massive 17-inch version with the desktop CPU? It's No. 2.

There's a big size difference between this 16-inch laptop and its 17-inch cousin. 

Sarah Tew/CNET Road trip laptop

In gaming laptops, performance is pretty much great all-around these days. That's why I was somewhat surprised to find myself on an extended out of town trip with the Origin PC Evo-16S as my only laptop.

Samsung Galaxy A50 With Exynos 9610 Shows Up On GeekbenchI had wanted to do some graphics design work, in Photoshop and Illustrator, and maybe a little gaming, too (mostly The Division 2). So that meant I needed a high-powered PC. But I also wasn't about to drag around something massive, like the Alienware Area-51m or pretty much any other 17-inch laptop. Since I was going to be in one location for most of my trip, a smaller 13- or even 15-inch screen didn't appeal.

And that's how I ended up in the country with a 16-inch laptop. Before that, I hadn't spent much time with the Evo-16S, Samsung Geekbench and its generic look hadn't especially caught my eye.